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Guatemalans deliberately infected with STDs sue Johns Hopkins University for $1bn

1.  From The Guardian April 2015

Guatemalans deliberately infected with STDs sue Johns Hopkins University for $1bn

Guatemala-syphilis-study--007Marta Orellana was experimented on when she was nine. Photograph: Rory Carroll/Guardian

…..The experiments, which occurred between 1945 and 1956, were kept secret until they were discovered in 2010 by a college professor, Susan Reverby…..

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During the experiments the following occurred:

Prostitutes were infected with venereal disease and then provided for sex to subjects for intentional transmission of the disease;…..

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2.  From CNN April 2 2015

Remember the Tuskegee syphilis experiment from the 1930s?

Scientists studied poor African-Americans in Alabama who’d contracted the venereal disease but didn’t tell them they had the disease or do anything to cure them.

A lawsuit filed this week alleges Johns Hopkins University and the Rockefeller Foundation helped conduct a similar study in Guatemala from 1945 to 1956…..

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Survivors tell of damaged lives after being deliberately infected in secret 1940s experiment on 1,500 men, women and children

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4. .  Extract from Rockeller commentary on lawsuit

The Facts on the unethical medical testing performed in Guatemala in the 1940’s

In 2010, the United States government formally apologized to the people of Guatemala for conducting morally objectionable and highly unethical medical experiments on Guatemalan citizens in 1947-48.  …

A 205-page Report of the U.S. Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues issued in September 2011 detailed how the U.S. Public Health Service (USPHS) designed, funded, and carried out the experiments in conjunction with Guatemalan health authorities, laying complete responsibility at the hands of the United States government

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5.  From Johns Hopkins

A Commentary on Reports by the Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues

In 2011, the Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues released two reports of great importance to the public and to the medical and public health research communities.

The studies were approved and conducted by the U.S. government and by individuals acting on behalf of the U.S. government. As reported by the Commission, several individuals in prominent academic positions at American universities served either as expert volunteers or employees of the government on the government-appointed committees that reviewed and recommended approval of and funding for the studies.

Among those identified in the Commission’s report as serving in such roles on the government’s behalf were several individuals associated with Johns Hopkins.[1]

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1 These include Dr. Joseph E. Moore, who at the time held the title of professor at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and was director of the Venereal Disease Division; Dr. Harry Eagle, a commissioned officer and employee of the U.S. Public Health Service and director of the government’s USPHS Venereal Disease Research Laboratory, which was located at Johns Hopkins in what was then the School of Hygiene and Public Health; Dr. Lowell Reed, who at the time was a Johns Hopkins professor and statistician and also served as dean of the School of Hygiene and Public Health and later as president of the University; and Dr. Thomas B. Turner, who at the time was a professor in the School of Medicine and later became dean of the School of Medicine. The Commission’s report also identified Dr. Reed and Dr. Kenneth Maxcy, a Johns Hopkins epidemiologist, as members of the government’s National Advisory Health Council, which recommended funding for the proposal to the U.S. surgeon general. The report listed Dr. Lewis Weed, who earlier served as dean of the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, as holding government positions on the National Research Council and on the Committee on Medical Research.

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